Thursday, February 10, 2011

Terror DBQ


In the French Revolution, the collaboration of reformers known as the Terror radically reformed the government in a revolution that killed thousands of unharmful citizens. The revolution came about in 1793, and with the many French people that were for the revolution, there were some that were against it. The group called the Terror, ran by Jaques Robespierre, made a point in this time to execute all nonreformers with mass executions, guillotines, drowning, and shootings. One former ally of Robespierre, however, analyzed the efficiency of this asking, “Do you believe that these women, these old men, these weaklings, those egoists, these strugglers of the Revolution, whom you imprison, are really dangerous?” (Doc.6). In response to this question in situation, the use of the terror and the guillotine in the midst of the revolution left France in greater economic depression and with less power; therefore, the consumption of power taken by the Terror was not deserving and useful because of the lack of nationalism that it left within the weakened state.
            Through the crude acts of the Terror, supporters claimed that the revolution “equipped the innocent and punished the guilty” (Doc 9). This is was executed by masses of people guillotined in public to scare the innocent to not deviate from the revolution. Also, mass executions were idealized with a cannoned “grape shot” that would instantly knock out an entire about 4,000 non conformers; this was thought to be useful because these non conformists were hindering the revolution (Doc 5). Various amounts of people were killed per day, because anyone that knew an enemy, had an record of acts against the state, were in a conspiracy, with counter revolutionary opinions, who refused alliegence with government, who concealed the refractory clergy, and who had any type of suspicious corruptive behavior were killed (Doc. 3). Because the Terror was a group looking to empower the third estate, 25% of their killings were on nobles in Paris, and blood swept the streets because of it (Doc.2).
            Many had pity for the non reformers and came to realize that the height of the crime induced by killing so many people was equally corrupt as the crimes that the victims were guilty for (Doc.4). Robespierre believed that it took extraordinary activity (executions) to enforce and move along a revolution of an entire nation (Doc.7). The public, however, felt otherwise; they believed that their friends and family were being tried, imprisoned, and killed as victims of “ambition, cupidity, jealousy, and, in short, every human passion” (Doc 10). People did become fearful of the Terror’s great destructive power, but in many ways, they could not get out of the irrational situations that only unsteadied the situation (Doc.8).  Most of the killings happened in Paris and within the peasantry outside of France; this left jobs empty but a greater power of the lower class. Peasants were uneasily corrupted in the revolution and were therefore guillotined for their counter reformed ideals (Doc.12). The people saw to much disregard a great scar be ripped across their country in the French Revolution.
            If a revolution killed so many, then it was not useful; scarring the public to become revolutionaries only makes for a weaker nation because many are not passionate about the reforming. Almost  ever citizen wished for the government committees to be abolished, but the destructive manor I which that was executed was immoral and infantile (Doc.13). Robespierre came from a hard life himself and should have found it even harder to kill so many others, knowing that it would crush many families (Doc. 7,6). Unfortunately, Robespierre found it to be better for the state to kill than to protect, leaving France in a state of quandary in the end. The French economy was crushed and inflation skyrocketed because of the Terror.
            The Terror was extraordinary in its power and ability to hold authority over all of France; this authority, however was held through inserting massive fear within the people and that was only a better was to bring disorganization to the country Main reformer, Robespierre asked that every Frenchman conform to reform in an inappropriate, hostile manor that was irrational and unsupported by much of France. It may take extraordinary forces to change a people but killing of the innocent is not loyal to the sustainability of a country. 

1 comment:

  1. Too wordy: "In response to this question in situation, the use of the terror and the guillotine in the midst of the revolution left France in greater economic depression and with less power; therefore, the consumption of power taken by the Terror was not deserving and useful because of the lack of nationalism that it left within the weakened state."

    Try: The guillotine left France in far greater economic depression than the horrible economic policies of Louis XVI ever could have.

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